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The Turn-Tale Wolf

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The Turn-Tale Wolf
The Turn-Tale Wolf
Directed By: Robert McKimson
Produced By: Eddie Selzer
Released: June 28, 1952
Series: Merrie Melodies
Story: Tedd Pierce
Animation: Herman Cohen
Phil DeLara
Charles McKimson
Rod Scribner
Layouts: Peter Alvarado
Backgrounds: Richard H. Thomas
Film Editor: Treg Brown
Voiced By: Mel Blanc
Music: Carl W. Stalling
Starring: Big Bad Wolf
Wolf's Nephew
Three Little Pigs
Preceded By: Ain't She Tweet
Succeeded By: Cracked Quack

The Turn-Tale Wolf is a 1952 Merrie Melodies cartoon directed by Robert McKimson.

Summary

A little wolf is embarrassed by his uncle The Big Bad Wolf, so the Big Bad Wolf reworks the story so that the pigs are the aggressors.

Plot

The Big Bad Wolf's proper little nephew has learned at school that his uncle was the fiend who blew the Three Little Pigs' houses down and is ashamed that his uncle, flesh of his flesh and blood of his blood, could have committed such a deed. When confronted by his nephew with this information, Big Bad pleads innocent. He tells a quite different story of how he was an innocent, nature-loving kid tormented by Three sadistic Little Pigs, who, upon reading of a 50 dollar bounty for a wolf's tail, chased him home and blew his house down! And when the nephew calls his story malarkey, it turns out that Big Bad's story is real, evidenced on his missing tail!

Trivia

  • The three little pigs in the cartoon are the same villainous pigs previously seen in the Bugs Bunny cartoon The Windblown Hare, directed by Robert McKimson three years earlier.
  • The story is similar in concept to The Trial Of Mister Wolf (1941), where both cartoons center on a wolf pleading for innocent by telling an alternate story where the wolf is the protagonist and the victims (Red Riding Hood for Trial of Mister Wolf, Three Little Pigs for Turn-Tale Wolf) are the aggressors.

Censorship

  • The FOX Merrie Melodies Show version of this cartoon cuts a brief shot of the Big Bad Wolf bootlegging alcohol in his house, then trying to cover it up when he hears his son angrily entering the house.
  • The WB's version left in the bootlegging scene, but cut the part in which one of the Three Little Pigs chides the Wolf with the line "Ah, go blow yer brains out!" after the Wolf asks them why they're so mean to him.

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