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I've Got to Sing a Torch Song

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I've Got to Sing a Torch Song
Torch song
Directed By: Tom Palmer
Produced By: Leon Schlesinger
Released: September 23, 1933
Series: Merrie Melodies
Story:
Animation: Jack King
Layouts:
Backgrounds:
Film Editor: Treg Brown (uncredited)
Voiced By:
Music: Bernard B. Brown
Norman Spencer
Starring:
Preceded By: Bosko's Picture Show
Succeeded By: The Dish Ran Away with the Spoon
LT066- "I've Got to Sing a Torch Song"06:47

LT066- "I've Got to Sing a Torch Song"

I've Got to Sing a Torch Song is a 1933 Merrie Melodies cartoon directed by Tom Palmer.

Plot

Blackout gags and music, including the title song.

Censorship

When this cartoon aired on Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon during the late 1980s (when it was on Nickelodeon's Nick at Nite block, which featured family-friendly sitcoms and shows meant for general audiences, as opposed to Nickelodeon's more kid-friendly fare that came on in the daytime), the following scenes were cut/altered:

  • The scene of Cros Bingsby crooning, "Why Can't This Night Go On Forever?" cut the brief shot of college coeds (some of which are shown in skimpy lingerie) listening to the broadcast.
  • The sequence of the radio show reaching international audiences cut the part where Chinese police officers on a rickshaw are sleeping and tie up the police radio transmitter so they won't be bothered by their boss and the part after where an African cannibal switches over to a cooking program and adds mustard and salt to his stew of explorers (shown as caricatures of 1930s vaudeville and film comedians Bert Wheeler and Robert Woosley) before stirring them. It should be noted that the scene after that, featuring an Inuit (Eskimo) fishing and being eaten by a whale was left in, despite that "Frigid Hare" was once banned for featuring a stereotypical Inuit hunter.
  • The scene of an Arab sheik shooing away his belly-dancing concubine and switching over to a broadcast of Amos 'n Andy had the Amos 'n Andy broadcast redubbed with music from the beginning of the short.

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