Looney Tunes Wiki

8 Ball Bunny

3,374pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Add New Page Talk0
8 Ball Bunny
8 ball Bunny
Directed By: Charles M. Jones
Produced By: Eddie Selzer (uncredited)
Released: July 8, 1950
Series: Looney Tunes
Story: Michael Maltese
Animation: Phil Monroe
Ben Washam
Lloyd Vaughan
Ken Harris
Emery Hawkins
Layouts: Peter Alvarado
Backgrounds: Peter Alvarado
Film Editor: Treg Brown (uncredited)
Voiced By: Mel Blanc
Dave Barry (uncredited)
John T. Smith (uncredited)
Norman Nesbitt (uncredited)
Music: Carl Stalling
Starring: Bugs Bunny
Playboy Penguin
Humphrey Bogart
Preceded By: All a Bir-r-r-d
Succeeded By: It's Hummer Time
8 Ball Bunny07:08

8 Ball Bunny

8 Ball Bunny is a Looney Tunes cartoon directed by Chuck Jones and written by Michael Maltese. It was animated in 1949 and released July 8, 1950.


The Brooklyn Ice Palace shuts down after the Ice Frolics packs up to go to another show somewhere else, but during their departure, the Ice Frolics crew forget their star performer, "Playboy" Penguin. As Playboy attempts to catch up with the convoy of trucks, he accidentally falls into Bugs Bunny's hole. At first, Bugs thinks he's having a nightmare, but upon discovering what woke him up, he scolds Playboy for "crashing" into his slumber. Just as Playboy begins to cry, Bugs, now feeling guilty over his actions, apologizes to Playboy and, after finding out he's lost, promises to help him get home. He then looks up Playboy in a book to discover he's a penguin and that his "home" is the South Pole, much to Bugs' shock.

To go down south, Bugs and Playboy hitch a ride on a freight train to New Orleans. Just as Bugs laments on making such a "big fat" promise, Playboy begins to cry again, but Bugs quickly apologizes saying he can't stand to see penguins cry. A hungry vagrant, sharing their boxcar, states, "Me neither. Penguins is practically chickens." and decides to make a meal out of Playboy. Bugs stands up for Playboy by pointing out he's bigger than Playboy, so the hobo decides to turn Bugs into rabbit stew, but Bugs coyly trips and kicks the hobo. Just as the hobo runs to him, Bugs opens the door so that the hobo falls off the train, much to Playboy's amusement.

Once in New Orleans, Bugs puts Playboy aboard a ship named Admiral Byrd, which he believes is going to the South Pole. Pleased with his good deed, Bugs decides to order a carrot martini at "La Bouche Cafe" and stay for Mardi Gras, which Bugs pronounces as "Madry Grass". The stay, however, is interrupted when Bugs overhears from a captain and a sailor that the Admiral Byrd is bound for Brooklyn, New York — back to where the journey started. Realizing what he's put Playboy into, Bugs swims out to catch up with the ship, rescuing Playboy from the ship's galley, and swimming ashore to Martinique.

While Bugs strums a guitar and composes a ballad, Playboy is forced to build the boat. As Bugs is playing, Humphrey Bogart, straight out of the Martinique-based film To Have and Have Not, appears and says "Pardon me, but could you help out a fellow American who's down on his luck?" Bugs throws a coin at him and says "Hit the road!"

After ten days at sea, Bugs is beginning to feel hungry, having not taken any food with them. Upon looking at Playboy, Bugs remembers the hobo saying "and penguins is practically chickens" and decides to eat Playboy, but immediately snaps out of his daze and apologizes to Playboy, just as he spots land. The land, however, is the Panama Canal and when the guard at the first lock demands a quarter for passage through, Bugs decides he and Playboy will continue the journey on foot.

As Bugs' and Playboy's route is traced out on a map of South America, they are soon captured by some natives and put into a huge stew pot, at which Bugs blames Playboy for getting them into that mess. Just as a panicked native comes in screaming "El bwana," the natives immediately run away, panic-stricken. As Bugs wonders if the bwana is as dangerous as the natives made it out to be, the strange creature is actually Humphrey Bogart, who then asks Bugs to help him out again. Rather than berate him again, Bugs just gives him a coin for saving his skin and then he and Playboy resume their journey.

Bugs and Playboy's route continues down through South America, with Bugs having to swing through trees, outswim a hungry crocodile, and scale a mountain in the Andes. Upon reaching Cape Horn, it's a boat ride down to the tip of Antarctica, and then a journey on foot across the ice cap. When they finally reach the South Pole (depicted as a candy striped pole), Bugs angrily tells Playboy that he's done his good deed and so now he's going back home himself. Playboy then begins to cry again, his tears turning into ice cubes from the cold. His conscience nagging at him again, Bugs feels guilty and asks Playboy what's wrong now. Playboy then takes out a flier from his hat, which tells Bugs that he was born in Hoboken, where the Ice Frolics' main headquarters is, much to Bugs' shock.

Just as Bugs is about to lose his mind over having to take Playboy all the way back, Humphrey Bogart appears again and starts to ask for Bugs' help. Not wanting to go through what he'd been through with Playboy again, Bugs asks Humphrey Bogart to help him instead. With that, he thrusts Playboy into Humphrey Bogart's hands and runs off, screaming insanely into the distance.


8 Ball Bunny is the second appearance of Playboy; his first appearance was in 1949's Frigid Hare. The Bogart voice was performed by impressionist Dave Barry (no relation, of course, to the humor columnist).

While the film is introduced by the Looney Tunes music The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down, the opening card indicates a Merrie Melodies Blue Ribbon release with the 1959–1964 red rings, as does the end card, replacing the original green opening and ending sequences.


The short is included in the home video release Looney Tunes Video Show Volume 3, can be seen as a bonus feature on the DVD releases of the movie The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (the Humphrey Bogart caricature in this cartoon short is based on Bogart's character in the film) and the documentary film March of the Penguin, and is featured (uncut, uncensored, and digitally remastered) on the fourth volume of the Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD set. It is also featured on the first volume of the Looney Tunes Platinum Collection Blu-ray and DVD series.


On ABC's The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show, the part where Bugs and Playboy are captured by South American natives is edited to remove the part where one of the natives runs to warn the group of "bwana" Humphrey Bogart coming and the group scattering. The scene was replaced with a frozen shot of Bogart's feet while the sound of the group muttering and fleeing was heard.


External Links

8 Ball Bunny at
8 Ball Bunny at B99.TV

Preceded by
What's Up Doc?
Bugs Bunny Cartoons
Succeeded by
Hillbilly Hare
Bugs Bunny Cartoons
1938 Porky's Hare Hunt
1939 Prest-O Change-OHare-um Scare-um
1940 Elmer's Candid CameraA Wild Hare
1941 Elmer's Pet RabbitTortoise Beats HareHiawatha's Rabbit HuntThe Heckling HareAll This and Rabbit StewWabbit Twouble
1942 The Wabbit Who Came to SupperThe Wacky WabbitHold the Lion, PleaseBugs Bunny Gets the BoidFresh HareThe Hare-Brained HypnotistCase of the Missing Hare
1943 Tortoise Wins by a HareSuper-RabbitJack-Wabbit and the BeanstalkWackiki WabbitFalling Hare
1944 Little Red Riding RabbitWhat's Cookin' Doc?Bugs Bunny and the Three BearsBugs Bunny Nips the NipsHare Ribbin'Hare ForceBuckaroo BugsThe Old Grey HareStage Door Cartoon
1945 Herr Meets HareThe Unruly HareHare TriggerHare ConditionedHare Tonic
1946 Baseball BugsHare RemoverHair-Raising HareAcrobatty BunnyRacketeer RabbitThe Big SnoozeRhapsody Rabbit
1947 Rabbit TransitA Hare Grows in ManhattanEaster YeggsSlick Hare
1948 Gorilla My DreamsA Feather in His HareRabbit PunchBuccaneer BunnyBugs Bunny Rides AgainHaredevil HareHot Cross BunnyHare SplitterA-Lad-In His LampMy Bunny Lies Over The Sea
1949 Hare DoMississippi HareRebel RabbitHigh Diving HareBowery BugsLong-Haired HareKnights Must FallThe Grey Hounded HareThe Windblown HareFrigid HareWhich Is WitchRabbit Hood
1950 Hurdy-Gurdy HareMutiny on the BunnyHomeless HareBig House BunnyWhat's Up Doc?8 Ball BunnyHillbilly HareBunker Hill BunnyBushy HareRabbit of Seville
1951 Hare We GoRabbit Every MondayBunny HuggedThe Fair-Haired HareRabbit FireFrench RarebitHis Hare-Raising TaleBallot Box BunnyBig Top Bunny
1952 Operation: RabbitFoxy by Proxy14 Carrot RabbitWater, Water Every HareThe Hasty HareOily HareRabbit SeasoningRabbit's KinHare Lift
1953 Forward March HareUp-Swept HareSouthern Fried RabbitHare TrimmedBully For BugsLumber Jack-RabbitDuck! Rabbit, Duck!Robot Rabbit
1954 Captain HareblowerBugs and ThugsNo Parking HareDevil May HareBewitched BunnyYankee Doodle BugsBaby Buggy Bunny
1955 Beanstalk BunnySahara HareHare BrushRabbit RampageThis Is A Life?Hyde and HareKnight-Mare HareRoman Legion-Hare
1956 Bugs' BonnetsBroom-Stick BunnyRabbitson CrusoeNapoleon Bunny-PartBarbary-Coast BunnyHalf-Fare HareA Star is BoredWideo WabbitTo Hare Is Human
1957 Ali Baba BunnyBedevilled RabbitPiker's PeakWhat's Opera, Doc?Bugsy and MugsyShow Biz BugsRabbit Romeo
1958 Hare-less WolfHare-Way To The StarsNow Hare ThisKnightly Knight BugsPre-Hysterical Hare
1959 Baton BunnyHare-Abian NightsApes of WrathBackwoods BunnyWild and Woolly HareBonanza BunnyA Witch's Tangled HarePeople Are Bunny
1960 Horse HarePerson to BunnyRabbit's FeatFrom Hare to HeirLighter Than Hare
1961 The Abominable Snow RabbitCompressed HarePrince Violent
1962 Wet HareBill of HareShishkabugs
1963 Devil's Feud CakeThe Million HareHare-Breadth HurryThe UnmentionablesMad as a Mars HareTransylvania 6-5000
1964 Dumb PatrolDr. Devil and Mr. HareThe Iceman DuckethFalse Hare
1979 Bugs Bunny's Christmas CarolThe Fright Before Christmas
1980 Portrait of the Artist as a Young BunnySpaced Out Bunny
1990 Box Office Bunny
1991 Blooper Bunny
1992 Invasion Of The Bunny Snatchers
1995 Carrotblanca
1996 From Hare To Eternity
2004 Daffy Duck for PresidentHare and Loathing In Las Vegas

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki